Posts Tagged ‘cooking-how to’

Cooking in 10 Minutes.

Cooking in 10 Minutes. Cover of 1994 US Edition.

  Cooking in Ten Minutes by Edouard de Pomaine.

“Do not imagine that ten-minute cooking is going to condemn you to an eternal round of       beef-steak without any of the frills of finer cookery.

Your gas stove has two burners, if not three.  What is to prevent you cooking slices of ox kidney saute’ in butter on the one, while you make a sauce bearnaise on the other?

During the same ten minutes you can prepare both the kidneys and the sauce.  The result is delicious.  I have done it time and again.  Thanks to the sauce the ordinary ox kidneys, despised by the fastidious, assume an aristocratic manner.

You can always prepare meat and a sauce, but are there many rapidly prepared sauces? That all depends on the liveliness of your imagination.  Invent the sauces.  The great thing is to prepare them quickly, and for this you must follow the advice which I shall give you for the preparation of some standard sauces.”

~~~~~

Here’s what Elizabeth David wrote about Pomaine in her book An Omelette and a Glass of Wine.  [pp. 175-182]

“In the days when Pomaine was writing, chefs did not dream of braising vegetables – lettuces, leeks, Belgian endives, for example – without a preliminary blanching.  That rule was immutable, and woe betide anyone who disregarded it.  Dr. de Pomaine bypassed it, and I adopted his method, particularly his recipe for cooling Belgian endives in butter and entirely without a prior water baptism.  That sort of unorthodoxy got one into trouble. …

Doctor Edouard de Pomaine’s real name was Edouard Pozerski.  He was of purely Polish origin, the son of emigres who had fled Poland and settled in Paris after the Revolution of 1863.  …

De Pomaine was the first writer to propound such happenings as the fusion of egg yolks and olive oil in a mayonnaise, the sizzling of a potato chip when plunged into fat for deep-frying, in language so straightforward, so graphic, that even the least scientifically minded could grasp the principles instead of simply learning the rules.  In cooking, the possibility of muffing a dish is always with us.  Nobody can eliminate that.  What de Pomaine did by explaining the cause, was to banish the fear of failure.

Adored by his public and his pupils, feared by the phoney, derided by the reactionary, de Pomaine’s irreverent attitude to established tradition, his independence of mind backed up by scientific training, earned him the reputation of being something of a Candide, a provocative rebel disturbing the grave conclaves of French gastronnomes, questioning the hold rites of the ‘white-vestured officiating priests’ of classical French cookery.

Of a dish from the Swiss mountains, Dr. de Pomaine observes that it is ‘a peasant dish, rustic and vigorous.  It is not everybody’s taste.  But one can improve upon it.  Let us get to work.’ … ”

Resources:

10 Minute French Cooking Blog

Wikipedia article on 10 Minute French Cooking

Pel’meni Recipes 

Though it was born in the far frozen reaches of the tiga, Pel’meni warms hearts and tummies all over Russia and the

picture of a woman holding a steaming plate of Russian dumplings.

Russian poster promoting Pel’meni

countries that used to be part of the Soviet Union.  It’s Russia’s answer to fast food; real workers chow down at pelmennaya (pel’meni parlors). Pel’meni is food for the masses, but not mass-produced.  No canned pel’meni by Chef Boyar.  Students of Russian history may remember the boyars were the landed gentry class during Moscow’s formative years.

In permafrost regions, pel’meni were made in quantity, frozen and stored outdoors in sacks slung high away from dogs or other scavangers, then cooked as needed.  We can imitate those resourceful Siberian cooks by freezing the pel’meni on a tray and putting them in resealable freezer bags or containers to be cooked later.  Pel’meni can also be prepared and served immediately, but purists insist that pel’meni should be frozen before cooking.

In the old days — and probably in remote areas of Siberia today — cooks just took a frozen haunch and shaved or scraped off the meat needed for a batch of pel’meni.  The traditional horsemeat filling might be difficult to find, or to stomach now.  Modern Russians use ground beef, lamb and pork or mushrooms for the pel’meni filling.

Recipe #1:

Larissa Davidyuk’s Pel’meni

Larissa was my hostess in Moscow.  A scientist, she was unemployed when I visited her in the mid-1990’s.

Make an egg pasta dough.

3 cups flour

1 tsp. salt

1 egg

1 cup cold water

Using a mixer with bread hooks or food processer, blend four and salt, add egg, then add water gradually until dough forms a ball.  Transfer to a floured surface and knead about 2 minutes until smooth.  Cover and let stand for 1/2 hour.

[This Pel’meni dough recipe is adapted from  Please to the Table by Anya von Bremzen & John Welchman, Workman Publishing, N.Y. 1990.]

Meat filling: Mix of 1/3 pound each ground lamb, beef and pork.  Mix with salt, pepper, 2 tbsp. finely chopped garlic and the 1/2 cup minced whites of scallions.

Roll out the dough appx. 1/8″ thick. Cut circles with a glass. Place small spoonful of filling on the dough. Fold over and pinch closed.  Bring ends together.

Boil water.  Cook the pel’meni in boiling water until they rise in the water, then 5-7 minutes more.  Serve with butter or sour cream. Serves 4.

Once in Siberia, I was eager to pursue the quest for pel’meni.  You might even say I was hungry for an authentic local food experience.  The merest taste of those fish heads and bear paws was all I could manage.

In Khabarovsk, a port on the Amur River bordering China, the hunt for ultimate pel’meni took me to Natalya Mamadzhanova, a spirited blond businesswoman turned restauranteur. Last June, she opened V/Gostiakh u Natali, (“As Natalie’s Guest”), a homey little restaurant specializing in Russian food.

Recipe #2:

Natalie’s Pel’meni in Taiga Manner

Make a soft dough.  (see recipe above)

Make the filling:

To 1 pound of ground pork, add 1 large finely chopped onion and 6 chopped cloves of garlic.

Roll out dough to about 1/8″. Make the pel’meni by putting filling on a small circle of dough.  Fold dough over and seal.  Twist ends of half-circle around to form a ring.

Prepare the sauce:  Make a clear soup from meat bones. Put chopped onion, carrot, pepper, tomato and boiled paparnick (collard greens) in a soup kettle.  Cover vegetables with the hot bouillon.  Add sour cream, black pepper and Korean sauce (soy sauce).  Cook, covered, over warm heat, not boiling.

Meanwhile, cook the pel’meni in boiling salted water, about 8 minutes.  Put in a small serving dish and cover with the vegetable sauce.  Add garlic and warm dish on stove. Serves 4-6.

In the cavarnous, heavily curtained dining rooms of what was once The Khabarovsk Intourist Hotel,  Pel’meni is served in a small ceramic pot which has been covered with a crust and baked. The broth is meaty and the pel’meni are bite sized

Recipe #3:

Intourist’s Pel’meni

Intourist provided tourist services, guides, information, reservations and minders for visitors during the Soviet era. Many large city hotels came under the wing of Intourist which was not known for its creativity, flexibility or attention to customer service.  However, their chefs did know how to make Pel-meni.

Meat mixture:  1 lb ground beef, salt, 1 1/2 cups minced onion, fresh ground black pepper.

On a piece of dough the size of a half-dollar piece, place a small amount of meat mixture.  Fold the dough over and press the edges together. Pull the ends around to  make a halo effect around the top.  Cook in boiling water, 5 minutes. Place pel’meni in small serving crock.  Add meat broth. Cover dish with a round of dough and press dough into sides of serving crock.  Bake in oven. Serves 4.

Recipe #4:

Sveta Gridin lives in Petropovlosk-Kamchatsky, a port on Kamchatka. She was a college student when I met her nearly 20 years ago. Though she is typically Russian in her devotion to family and spouse, her demanding class schedule means pel’meni making is tied to special occasions. I sampled Sveta’s pel’meni at a farewell party she gave for an American graduate student.  Her pel’meni are larger, more like meat dumplings and the cooking broth and vegetables form part of the meal.

Here is Sveta Gridin’s recipe for Pel’meni:

Filling: grind together 1 to 1-1/2 lb meat, 4-5 small onions, and salt and pepper.Dough: Mix 3 cups flour, 1 cup milk, 1/2 tsp salt, 3 eggs. Knead and refrigerate.  Roll into log 3/4″ thick and cut into 1/2″ slices.  Press or roll into circles 1 1/2″ diameter, 1/4″ thick.

Make the Pel’meni: Place small tsp of meat in center of each rolled dough circle.  Pinch closed.  Place on a floured cooking sheet.  Boil water with chopped carrot, cabbage, salt and bay leaf.  Remove vegetables with slotted spoon. Drop pel’meni into the boiling vegetable water and cook for 10 min.  Serve with butter.  The broth becomes the soup course and the vegetables are served on the side.

A version of these recipes appeared in the Culinary Historians of Washington newsletter.

My Quest for Pel’meni

Pel’meni – Siberian Meat Dumplings – hail from the frozen reaches of the Russian Far East. The dumplings are of Mongolian origin and the word Pel’meni is always plural, I was told by Russians.  Apparently you can neither make nor eat just one..

Pel’meni warm tummies all over Russia and the countries that used to be part of the Soviet Union. It could be Russia’s answer to fast food — filling and ready to eat, assuming you have a supply of pre-made Pel’meni in the freezer or a local restaurant specializing in dumplings.

Pel’meni are food for the masses, but not mass-produced.  Workers chow down at pelmennaya (pel’meni restaurants) but the dumplings are still made by hand.  I haven’t yet seen canned pel’meni by Chef Boyar. The boyars were the landed gentry class during Moscow’s formative years, some centuries ago.

In permafrost regions, pel’meni were made in quantity, frozen and stored outdoors in sacks slung high away from dogs or other scavengers. Then the dumplings were cooked as needed.  We can imitate those resourceful Siberian cooks by freezing the pel’meni on a tray and putting them in re-sealing freezer containers to be cooked later.

Pel’meni can also be prepared and served immediately, but purists insist that pel’meni should be frozen before cooking.

In the old days — and possibly in remote areas of Siberia today — cooks just took a frozen haunch of whatever mammal wandered into a trap and shaved or scraped off the meat needed for a batch of pel’meni.  The traditional horsemeat filling might be difficult to find, or stomach nowadays.  Modern Russians use ground beef, lamb and pork or mushrooms for the pel’meni filling.

My first taste of Pel’meni occurred in St. Petersburg.  Larissa Davidyuk, my Siberian-born hostess rolled, stuffed and folded a pel’meni mountain which three adults and a teenager leveled at dinner.  Later, I read of a 19th century banquet at Lopashov’s Tavern in Moscow where twelve people dined on 2,500 pel’meni.  [The Art of Russian Cuisine by Anne Volokh, Collier Books, 1983].

Larissa urged me to try other versions of pel’meni during my stay in Siberia, and compare them with hers.  Did I detect a hit of smugness in her smile?  With Larissa’s pel’meni as the benchmark, how could I find such steaming morsels of flavor again

Like its kitchen-kin, ravioli, the bite-sized dumplings are made of ground seasoned meat wrapped in soft dough.  They are cooked in boiling water or broth and served with butter, sour cream or vinegar.  Sometimes pel’meni are served in the broth under a baked crust.

Pel’meni shapes vary according to the cook’s preference and dexterity.  Basically a small circle of dough is folded over a dab of meat filling, the dough edges are sealed and the ends brought together to make a loop.

****

Larissa Davidyuk’s Pel’meni

Larissa was my hostess in Moscow.  A scientist, she was unemployed when I visited her in the mid-1990’s.  She wrote her recipe in longhand and my Russian teacher at Montgomery College translated.

Make an egg pasta dough: that was Larissa’s instruction for making the dough.  Since she did not write a dough recipe for me, I adapted this from Please to the Table by Anya von Bremzen & John Welchman, Workman Publishing, N.Y. 1990.

3 cups flour

1 tsp. salt

1 egg

1 cup cold water

Using a mixer with bread hooks or food processor, blend four and salt, add egg, then add water gradually until dough forms a ball.  Transfer to a floured surface and knead about 2 minutes until smooth.  Cover and let stand for 1/2 hour.

Larissa’s meat filling: Mix of 1/3 pound each ground lamb, beef and pork.  Mix with salt, pepper, 2 tbsp. finely chopped garlic and the 1/2 cup minced whites of scallions.

Roll out the dough appx. 1/8″ thick. Cut circles with a glass. Place small spoonful of filling on the dough. Fold over and pinch closed.  Bring ends together.

Boil water.  Cook the pel’meni in boiling water until they rise in the water, then 5-7 minutes more.  Serve with butter or sour cream. Serves 4.

*****

Natalie’s Pel’meni in Taiga Manner

When I reached Siberia, I was eager to pursue the quest for pel’meni.  In Khabarovsk, a port on the Amur River bordering China, the hunt for ultimate pel’meni took me to Natalya Mamadzhanova, a spirited businesswoman who opened a homey little restaurant specializing in Russian traditional food called V/Gostiakh u Natali, “As Natalie’s Guest”.

Make a soft dough.  (see recipe above)

Make the filling:

To 1 pound of ground pork, add 1 large finely chopped onion and 6 chopped cloves of garlic.  Roll out dough to about 1/8″. Make the pel’meni by putting filling on a small circle of dough.  Fold dough over and seal.  Twist ends of half-circle around to form a ring.

Prepare the sauce:  Make a clear soup from meat bones. Put chopped onion, carrot, pepper, tomato and boiled paparnick (collard greens) in a soup kettle.  Cover vegetables with the hot bouillon.  Add sour cream, black pepper and Korean sauce (soy sauce).  Cook, covered, over warm heat, not boiling.

Meanwhile, cook the pel’meni in boiling salted water, about 8 minutes.  Put in a small serving dish and cover with the vegetable sauce.  Add garlic and warm dish on stove. Serves 4-6.

*****

Intourist’s Pel’meni

In the cavarnous, heavily curtained dining rooms of what was once the Khabarovsk Intourist Hotel, pel’meni come to the table in a small ceramic pot which has been covered with a crust and baked.

Meat mixture:  1 lb ground beef, salt, 1 1/2 cups minced onion, fresh ground black pepper.  On a piece of dough the size of a half-dollar piece, place a small amount of meat mixture.  Fold the dough over and press the edges together. Pull the ends around to  make a halo effect around the top.  Cook in boiling water, 5 minutes. Place pel’meni in small serving crock.  Add meat broth. Cover dish with a round of dough and press dough into sides of serving crock.  Bake in oven. Serves 4.

*****

Sveta Gridin’s Pel’meni

Sveta Gridin lives in Petropovlosk, the port city and capital of Kamchatka. A college student at the time I met her, she was maintaining a demanding course load while fulfilling the Russian woman’s traditional role of  devotion to family, household and spouse.  For her, pel’meni making is reserved for special occasions so I sampled Sveta’s pel’meni at a farewell party she gave for an American graduate student.  Her pel’meni are larger, more like meat dumplings and the cooking broth and vegetables form part of the meal.

Filling: grind together 1 to 1-1/2 lb meat, 4-5 small onions, and salt and pepper.

Dough: Mix 3 cups flour, 1 cup milk, 1/2 tsp salt, 3 eggs. Knead and refrigerate.  Roll into log 3/4″ thick and cut into 1/2″ slices.  Press or roll into circles 1 1/2″ diameter, 1/4″ thick.

Make the Pel’meni: Place small tsp of meat in center of each rolled dough circle.  Pinch closed.  Place on a floured cooking sheet.  Boil water with chopped carrot, cabbage, salt and bay leaf.  Remove vegetables with slotted spoon. Drop pel’meni into the boiling vegetable water and cook for 10 min.  Serve with butter.  The broth becomes the soup course and the vegetables are served on the side.

Back home, I researched pel’meni recipes in Russian cookbooks and I wanted to try the various recipes I’d collected in Russia.  The dough recipes were all more or less the same, no problem there.  I did chill the dough before rolling and cutting the pel’meni jackets.  For the filling, I mixed ¾ pound each ground beef and pork, two minced onions, salt, pepper and a dash of ground clove.

Labor intensive pel’meni shaping followed.  After a half-hour of nimble fingered filling, sealing and turning, I realized why all the cooks I’d seen making pel’meni were sitting down and working in teams.  Next time I convene a pel’meni party, I’ll invite the guests into the kitchen to cut dough and stuff.

Other resources:

Classic Russian Cooking, Elena Molokhovets’ A Gift to Young Housewives, Translated, introduced and annotated by Joyce Toomre, Indiana University Press, 1993.

Please to the Table, The Russian Cookbook, Anya von Bremzen and John Welchman, Workman Publishing, 1990.

The Art of Russian Cuisine, Anne Volokh with Mavis Manus.  Collier Books, 1983.

Lentils in Sauce is adapted from Madhur Jaffrey’s World Vegetarian cookbook

1 cup dried lentils

1 med. onion, finely chopped or grated

2 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped

4 tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley

1 tsp ground cumin

freshly ground black pepper

1 1/4 to 1 1/2 tsp salt

1 tsp olive oil

Pick over the lentils and wash in several changes of cold water.

Put the lentils, onion, garlic, parsley, cumin, black pepper to taste, and 3 cups of water in a medium pot.  Bring to a boil without allowing it to boil over. Turn the heat down to low and cover partially.  Cook gently for 30 min.  Add the salt and stir well.  Cook, particlly covered, another 30-40 min, or until the lentils are tender.  Stir in the oil.  Serve hot or at room temperature, depending on the season.

6 servings

 

Salmon grilled with Juniper, food and photo by LP O'Neil


Miso Pine Salmon

 

 

The original version of  this recipe appeared in Edible Ojai, Fall 2006 issue.  As all cooks do, I have modified it.

I first served it November 4, 2006 to honor adventure traveler Don Schlief who was heading out for several months in India.

The recipe was given by Kobun Chino Roshi, a Zen teacher and friend of the family at Blue Heron Ranch.

Here’s how I prepare this spectacularly simple delicious salmon.

Place in a large baking dish:

Fresh salmon — 2 or more pounds.

Score the skin side of the fish crosswise on a grid with cuts about 1/4 inch deep.

Mix and spread over the fish:

2 tbsp or more white/yellow miso paste mixed with a little water.

Turn fish skin side up and spread on more white/yellow miso paste.

Sprinkle with about 2 tbsp water and 2 tbsp rice vinegar (or white wine) over the fish.

Cut a fresh pine branch and place it on top of the fish.

Cook at 500 degrees F for about 15 min.  Monitor during cooking to prevent the pine branch from catching fire.  Remove pine before serving.

Resource: http://www.ediblecommunities.com/ojai

This recipe was created by David George, and published in The Herb Companion, February/March, 1996 p . 21

Vegitative Chili

Marinade:

1/4 cup olive oil

1/3 cup tamari

2 teaspoons chili powder

1 tablespoon cumin

1 teaspoon cardomom

 

Main Ingredients:

1 lb fresh firm tofu, cubed into bite size chomps

1 large onion diced

1 teaspoon or more minced garlic

4 tablespoons olive oil

1/2 teaspoon mustard seed

1 large can red kidney beans drained (save juice)

1 large can black beans (save juice)

1 big can crushed tomatoes

2 tablespoons basil

1 teaspoon cayenne pepper

 

Step 1. Put the cubed tofu in the marinade, preferably a glass bowl with plastic sealing lid so that the tofu + marinade can be shaken and evenly coat the tofu.  The longer the tofu soaks, the deeper the marinade seeps into the tofu.  For a fresh taste, add a cup of cranberry or orange juice to the marinade, also horseradish and  a pinch of tumeric – under

a half teaspoon!  Tumeric is anti-inflamatory, good for human skeleton.

Then you saute the onion, garlic and dry spices in a big cast iron fry pan or similar large skillet (with the little dab of oil listed with the spices) – ideally the mustard seed will pop like popcorn (medium high heat) so use a lid! Now before anything burns, but after the onions go limp and translucent, scoop in the marinated tofu with marinade if it isn’t too much liquid.

The heat should still be medium, but you will probably want to reduce after the mustard seed has popped.  Of course, you can omit the mustard seed too.  If the fry pan is well seasoned, the tofu should start to form a crust. Expect some to stick and scrape back with a metal spatula  to keep the tofu loose and browning on all sides. The next object is to bring all the tofu up to temp while not too gently browning the sides of the tofu cubes. This can take as long as 15 minutes. When the heat is right around medium-low,  the fu will not stick too much as it browns and you can flip it every two or three minutes. If some of the cubes go the way of the Berlin wall – not too worry.

The tofu can be served at this point as a flavorful cubes over rice with vegetables.

Or proceed with the chili —

Take the brief time between tofu flips to mix the rest of the goods in a stew pot, pressure cooker or slow cooker. When the tofu meets with your satisfaction, or you’re sick of flipping it, go ahead and toss it in the chili.

Cook slowly over low heat for at least two hours.  Test for flavor and consistency.  Add liquid if necessary as the cooking proceeds.

 

 




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