Posts Tagged ‘food writing’

Cooking in 10 Minutes.

Cooking in 10 Minutes. Cover of 1994 US Edition.

  Cooking in Ten Minutes by Edouard de Pomaine.

“Do not imagine that ten-minute cooking is going to condemn you to an eternal round of       beef-steak without any of the frills of finer cookery.

Your gas stove has two burners, if not three.  What is to prevent you cooking slices of ox kidney saute’ in butter on the one, while you make a sauce bearnaise on the other?

During the same ten minutes you can prepare both the kidneys and the sauce.  The result is delicious.  I have done it time and again.  Thanks to the sauce the ordinary ox kidneys, despised by the fastidious, assume an aristocratic manner.

You can always prepare meat and a sauce, but are there many rapidly prepared sauces? That all depends on the liveliness of your imagination.  Invent the sauces.  The great thing is to prepare them quickly, and for this you must follow the advice which I shall give you for the preparation of some standard sauces.”

~~~~~

Here’s what Elizabeth David wrote about Pomaine in her book An Omelette and a Glass of Wine.  [pp. 175-182]

“In the days when Pomaine was writing, chefs did not dream of braising vegetables – lettuces, leeks, Belgian endives, for example – without a preliminary blanching.  That rule was immutable, and woe betide anyone who disregarded it.  Dr. de Pomaine bypassed it, and I adopted his method, particularly his recipe for cooling Belgian endives in butter and entirely without a prior water baptism.  That sort of unorthodoxy got one into trouble. …

Doctor Edouard de Pomaine’s real name was Edouard Pozerski.  He was of purely Polish origin, the son of emigres who had fled Poland and settled in Paris after the Revolution of 1863.  …

De Pomaine was the first writer to propound such happenings as the fusion of egg yolks and olive oil in a mayonnaise, the sizzling of a potato chip when plunged into fat for deep-frying, in language so straightforward, so graphic, that even the least scientifically minded could grasp the principles instead of simply learning the rules.  In cooking, the possibility of muffing a dish is always with us.  Nobody can eliminate that.  What de Pomaine did by explaining the cause, was to banish the fear of failure.

Adored by his public and his pupils, feared by the phoney, derided by the reactionary, de Pomaine’s irreverent attitude to established tradition, his independence of mind backed up by scientific training, earned him the reputation of being something of a Candide, a provocative rebel disturbing the grave conclaves of French gastronnomes, questioning the hold rites of the ‘white-vestured officiating priests’ of classical French cookery.

Of a dish from the Swiss mountains, Dr. de Pomaine observes that it is ‘a peasant dish, rustic and vigorous.  It is not everybody’s taste.  But one can improve upon it.  Let us get to work.’ … ”

Resources:

10 Minute French Cooking Blog

Wikipedia article on 10 Minute French Cooking

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book cover

Endless Feasts Cover.

Endless Feasts — Sixty Years of Writing from Gourmet

  • Ruth Harkness munching on exotic pheasants left in a Tibetan Lamasery by monks fleeing the Chinese invaders in 1944 because that’s all the food she had.
  • Novelist Pat Conroy in Umbria rediscovering the food and sights through the eyes of his new mate.
  • The demise of the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in New York as told by Louis DiaGou, the chef who was ran the kitchen in 1910 when the hotel opened and was still there when it closed in 1950.

These are just three of the 41 narratives from  the late, great Gourmet magazine.  My grandmother wrote a few articles for Gourmet in the 1940s-early 50s.

I wonder…. do travelers possess innately complex palates that drive them to sample the world’s cuisines?  Or, does travel expose people to exotic — perhaps fresher — ingredients, unusual preparations and intriguing cultural traditions?

The interplay between food and travel is logical.  Go traveling and you’ll be foraging, whether at the street market in Ho Chi Min City, the Ritz in Paris,  a Bayou gumbo shack,  or at Havana, North Dakota’s community run Farmer’s Inn.

Travelers do develop faith in food; a meal is reward for a long day or night’s journey.  Sometimes the story is how grand that  meal; other times, how bad, and the aftermath.  These stories are nearly all about  the great meals and the iconoclasts who cooked them.  A few stories include recipes.

Details on the book: Edited and with an introduction by Ruth Reichl. Modern Library, 2002. 401 pages, no index, $24.95

A similar version of this article appeared in the  Bloomsbury Review.

Oldways is a non-profit culinary history organization based in Boston with a global outlook.

In 2011, Oldways initiated the K. Dun Gifford award for food journalism.  Affiliated reporters, freelancers and bloggers are eligible to enter.

Write and win a contest

Details:  http://www.oldwayspt.org/KDunGiffordAward 

Painting of garlic

Hot Garlic by Lupon

2011 Food Blogs and Websites

Washington DC specific:

Promotion for Edible Communitiesedible Communities publications connect local small-scale food producers with customers.   The magazines are linked to regions or urban centers and feature interviews with organic farmers, recipes, talks with chefs, vendors and regulators. Gorgeous design, graphics and photographs enhance the edible Communities publications.

http://www.ediblecommunities.com/content/  — Check out Edible Radio!

Nationally, the Edible Community of sustainable food  and organic farming advocates represent a significant audience of good food enthusiasts.

I met the co-founder, Tracey Ryder, years ago in one of the food writing workshops I teach for the University of California, Los Angeles.  At the time, she featured Edible Ojai in the portfolio of publications.  Marvelous to watch the concept grow and the audience for organic farm food expand exponentially.

Thank you, Tracey and colleagues, for your efforts to promote farmers and  the pleasures of food.  The James Beard Foundation Award, 2011 is well-deserved.

Congratulations!

Selected Reading List::Literary Non-Fiction, Biographical and Autobiographical  Writing  with a Culinary Focus

Aresty, Esther B.  The Delectable Past.  Simon and Schuster. 1964.

Beard, James.  Beard on Food. Alfred A. Knopf, 1974.

Behr, Edward. The Artful Eater. Atlantic Monthly Press, 1992.

Bemelmens, Ludwig.  La Bonne Table.  Simon and Schuster, 1964.

Brillat-Savarin, Anthelme.  The Physiology of Taste or Meditations on Transcendental Gastronomy.  Translated by M. F. K. Fisher.  Arion Press, 1994.  (original translation copyright 1949, The George Macy Cos. Inc.)

Clark, Robert.  James Beard, A Biography.  HarperCollins,  1993.

Colwin, Laurie, More Home Cooking, A Writer Returns to the Kitchen, HarperCollins, 1993

Conrad, Barnaby, Absinthe: History in a Bottle, Chronicle Books, 1988.

Critchley, Laurie and Helen Windrath, editors.  Feast! Women Write About Food.  Distributed by Trafalgar Square, N. Pomfret, VT. The Women’s Press, UK 1996.

Cronin, Isaac. The Mindful Cook. Finding awareness, simplicity, and freedom in the kitchen.  Villard, 1999.

David, Elizabeth.  An Omelette and A Glass of Wine, Lyons & Burford, 1997

David, Elizabeth.  South Wind Through the Kitchen.  The Best of Elizabeth David.  North Point Press, 1999.

Davidson, Alan. A Kipper With My Tea, North Point Press, 1990

de Pomaine, Edouard.  Cooking in Ten Minutes

Dorenberg, Andrew and Karen Page.  Dining Out.  John Wiley & Sons Inc.  1998

Dumas, Alexandre.  Dumas on Food.  Selections from Le Grand Dictionnaire de Cuisine.  Translated by Alan and Jane Davidson, Oxford Univ. Press, 1987.

Fisher, M.F.K. Stay Me, Oh Comfort Me, Journals and Stories, 1933-1941.

Pantheon Books, 1993

Fisher, M.F.K. The Art of Eating 50th Anniversary Edition, Wiley Publishing, 2004.

Fletcher, Angus, Colors of the Mind.

Gray, Patience. Honey from a Weed, North Point Press, 1986.

Harrison, Jim.  The Raw and the Cooked.  Grove Press, 2001

Jenkins, Steven.  Cheese Primer.  Workman Publishing Co., 1996.

Kummer, Corby.  The Joy of Coffee:  The Essential Guide to Buying, Brewing and Enjoying.  Chapters Publishing, 1999.

Leibling, A. J.  Between Meals. North Point Press, San Francisco, 1986

MacDonald, Betty.  The Egg and I.  Penguin Books, 1956.

Murray, Catherine Tripalin, editor.  A Taste of Memories from Columbus Park.

Reardon, Joan.  M.F.K. Fisher, Julia Child and Alice Waters: Celebrating the Pleasures of the Table. Harmony Books, 1994.

Romer, Elizabeth, The Tuscan Year.

Root, Waverly, The Food of France, Vintage Books, 1992.

Schwabe, Calvin, Unmentionable Cuisine

Simeti, Mary Taylor.  Pomp and Sustenance- 25 Centuries of Sicilian Food, Henry Holt, 1991.

Tannahill, Reay. Food in History. Three Rivers Press, 1973.
Thorne, John with Matt Lewis Thorne.  Serious Pig – An American Cook in Search of His Roots.  North Point Press-FSG, NY 1996.

Thorne, John with Matt Lewis Thorne.  Pot on the Fire – Further Explits of a Renegade Cook,  North Point Press, 2000.  Box 778, Northampton, MA 01061.

Thorne, John.  Outlaw Cook, 1992

Thorne, John.  Simple Cooking, 1987. He also publishes a newsletter called Simple Cooking.

Todhunter, Andrew. A Meal Observed. Alfred Knopf, 2004.

Toulouse-Lautrec, Henri and Maurice Joyant.  Translated by Margery Weiner.  Henry Holt and Co. 1996

Welsch, Roger. Cather’s Kitchen.

West, Michael Lee, Consuming Passions-A Food Obsessed Life, HarperCollins, 1999

Wolfert, Paula.  Cooking of Southwest France.




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